Welfare and Abuse

So at one point in my life, I considered doing my dissertation on the ways in which TANF (otherwise known as welfare) support the improvement of life of those who are a part of that system. At the time I noticed that education was not high on the list of things a person needed, while work was. Thirty hours per week were to be dedicated to work, while education could get twelve. So, I finish my work toward a high school diploma and want to get a bit of college; as statistics go, I am going to need some college at least if I want to make a decent wage, right? But as it turns out, I have to be involved in work or work-related activities for most of my week and can’t get a transportation allowance or childcare for the weird night hours I have to take classes. It’s weird.

I lived in New Jersey then and still get messages from the Welfare Peer Network. While that is a subject I would still like to tackle sometime, I noticed that the latest issue of the Peer Network newsletter included an overview of a workshop on how economic empowerment is affected by domestic violence.

If you read and look at the attachments (scroll down and look for the Domestic Violence header), there is commentary about the connection between TANF and the domestic violence community that goes into safety and empowerment. Take a look and share your thoughts; I am concerned that while it is great to see an effort being put forth to improve the lives of domestic violence victims, I am also concerned about the general level of education that TANF recipients are encouraged to achieve.

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One thought on “Welfare and Abuse

  1. It’s one of those “between a hard place and a rock” situations that bureaucrats don’t want to bother themselves to look at. It’s easier for them to remain in the dark ages. They really don’t care about making education accessible or acknowledging the fact that no-one can make a living wage doing menial labor.

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